Professionals celebrating their accountability with a fist bump

iHire’s Core Values Series: Accountable

Posted: August 05, 2016

The lazy way to define “accountability” is, well, being accountable! Though it may seem like a simple concept, it’s a critical part of our success as a business.

Here is how iHire defines “accountable”:

Definition of iHire's core value: accountable

“We do what we say we will do and proactively communicate if a commitment cannot be met, along with a plan for how and when we will resolve the situation.”

Why is accountability important to our culture? It’s how we measure and report our progress. It’s how we take ownership of projects and processes. It’s how we respond when things don’t go as planned. It’s how we take responsibility for our actions (or our non-actions).

According to Salary.com, only 60% of workers in the US are held accountable. This figure both surprises and disappoints me, because accountability is so instrumental to a high-performing workplace. When efforts fail, take responsibility and learn. When efforts succeed, give credit to those who contributed.

Want to strengthen your accountability? Here are some of the strategies we follow:

  • Set goals and measure your progress
  • Hold yourself accountable and find a colleague to do the same
  • Reward yourself – celebrate your wins and your coworkers’ successes
  • Be honest and realistic about what you’re able to accomplish – learn to say “no” when necessary
  • Recognize your strengths and improve your weaknesses
  • Give feedback to others and ask for feedback in return

Stay tuned as we continue our series on iHire’s core values.

 

Have a question for our team or something you’d like to share? Are you an expert in your field and interested in contributing to our blog? Just send an email to natalie.winzer@ihire.com.

Vickie Krolak, iHire
Posted by: Vickie Krolak, iHire
Are you an expert in your field? Want to share your knowledge and contribute to our blog as a guest author? We'd love to hear from you!
Get Started